The Gender Pay Gap: an (Early) Modern Reality

This post on the value of household accounts as a source documenting the gender pay gap comes from Imogene Dudley, a current doctoral student at the University of Exeter and a member of the Women’s Work in Early Modern England project led by Professor Jane Whittle and funded by the Leverhulme Trust. She has a Master’s degree in Medieval History from St. Hilda’s College, Oxford, and a Bachelor’s degree in History from Swansea University. You can follow her on Twitter: @imogene_dudley

Imogene Dudley (University of Exeter)

Recently, an Australian café made headline news around the world by charging men 18% more in order to reflect the gender pay gap. Whilst many supported this move to open up the conversation about wage inequality, the café and its owner also attracted widespread opposition, with people branding it divisive and illegal. The BBC has also come under fire in recent weeks as it was revealed that its female stars are paid significantly less than their male counterparts. These are just two examples of the gender pay gap which have hit the headlines lately; one would have to live under a rock to have missed the rising visibility of this issue across mainstream and social media in the last several years.

It would come as a surprise to no-one that the gender pay gap is rooted firmly in our historical past. Hopefully, by studying this issue in relation to the past, we can begin to understand its presence in our own times. My doctoral research focuses on women’s work in the south-west of England from 1500 to 1700, looking at household account books to explore the gender division of labour, the effect of the life-cycle on women’s work and (you guessed it) women’s wages. Continue reading “The Gender Pay Gap: an (Early) Modern Reality”

Postdoctoral Research Associate Women, Property and Place in the World, 1500-1800

The School of Histories, Languages and Cultures at the University of Hull is looking to appoint a Postdoctoral Research Associate for the project of Women, Property and Place in the World, 1500-1800.  This is a fixed term post for two years.

The central aim of the project is to investigate the institutional and structural underpinnings of social and gender inequalities in the English past. The post involves joint research and publication on land records and family papers (correspondence, diaries, wills, accounts, maps/surveys, enclosure records and estate papers); early-modern printed political and religious pamphlets; court, finance and litigation records. Additionally, the post will involve management of the existing website and Twitter account and mentoring doctoral students in the research cluster. The successful candidate will join an existing and vibrant team of academic, early-career and postgraduate researchers working in the Gender, Place and Memory 1400-1900 interdisciplinary Research Cluster at the University of Hull. The successful candidate will have completed a PhD in a cognate area of research, to include social and economic history, cultural history, historical geography, early-modern political thought and/or literature. It is desirebale that candidates will have experience working on early-modern English archival and/or printed texts.

For more information on how to apply see here: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BDD084/postdoctoral-research-associate-women-property-and-place-in-the-world-1500-1800/

To find out more about the Gender, Place and Memory 1400-1900 Research Cluster, its workshops, conferences and blog, see: [https://genderplaceandmemory.wordpress.com/].

To discuss this role informally, please contact the Principle Investigators: Dr Amanda Capern [a.l.capern@hull.ac.uk] or Briony McDonagh,[b.mcdonagh@hull.ac.uk].

Call for Proposals Attending to Early Modern Women: Action and Agency

 

attending to early modern women

Attending to Early Modern Women: Action and Agency, June 14-17, 2018     Milwaukee, WI

Call for Proposals

Over its time in Milwaukee, Attending to Early Modern Women first asked “where?” (Remapping Routes and Spaces, 2012). Then we asked “when?” (It’s About Time, 2015). Now we ask “how?” For both our subjects and ourselves, the answer is the same: action and agency. The conference will address these themes, posing such questions as: How do we understand the sites and modes of gendered confrontations in the early modern period? What collectivities were possible, then and now, and how and why do they form and fade? How do women imagine choice, and what role does choice or the illusion of choice play in their lives? How can our work as scholars and teachers of a distant period become action?

The conference will retain its innovative format, using a workshop model for most of its sessions to promote dialogue, augmented by a keynote lecture, and a plenary panel on each of the four conference topics: confrontation, collectivity, choice, and pedagogy. It will be held at the UW-Milwaukee School of Continuing Education in the heart of downtown Milwaukee, and conference attendees will stay in the near-by Doubletree Hotel. Attendees will also have the opportunity to participate in a pre-conference workshop at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

Start thinking now about organizing workshop sessions. Continue reading “Call for Proposals Attending to Early Modern Women: Action and Agency”

One Week Left to Submit a Proposal for Invisible Hands: Reassessing the History of Work, Glasgow 16th-18th May 2018

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16-18 May 2018

University of Glasgow

Invisible Hands: Reassessing the History of Work

Call for Papers

It is becoming increasingly clear that attending to the relationship between gender and work demands a fundamental reassessment of the very nature of economic performance, rather than the simple addition of women to existing accounts of economic continuity and change. This conference is designed to foster interdisciplinary and comparative discussion of the insights that gender analysis and feminist economics can bring to the history of work, and the relationship of gendered divisions of labour to economic performance more generally.

The conference will be hosted by the Centre for Gender History at the University of Glasgow, and marks the culmination of the activities of an International Network funded by the Leverhulme Trust on ‘Producing Change: Gender and Work in Early Modern Europe’. Bringing together Partners from the Universities of Autonoma de Barcelona, Cambridge, Glasgow, Leiden, Rouen and Uppsala, the Network has been designed to seize a timely opportunity to foster collaborative and comparative research on the multi-lateral character of both women and men’s work; to reconceptualise economic activity; and to reassess the dynamics of economic change. Continue reading “One Week Left to Submit a Proposal for Invisible Hands: Reassessing the History of Work, Glasgow 16th-18th May 2018”

CfP: Unwed motherhood in 18th- and 19th-century history

Unwed motherhood in 18th– and 19th-century history.

Contextualizing pauper and female agency.

CFP for a panel at the European Social Science History Conference, Belfast, 4-7 April, 2018

Organisers: Griet Vermeesch (VUB-Free University of Brussels) and Ariadne Schmidt (Leiden University)

This session deals with the ‘pauper agency’ and ‘gender agency’ of single mothers as a particular lower social group whose experiences, prospects and constrains were decisively shaped by the changing economic, political and social contexts of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In that period, illegitimacy rates dramatically rose from 1 or 2 percent in 1750 to 5 per cent around 1800 to levels of 10 and 20 percent by the mid-nineteenth century. These rising rates and the associated economic, political and social fields of tension link up with profound transformations in European history as a whole, and have for good reason unceasingly captivated historians ever since the 1970’s.  Continue reading “CfP: Unwed motherhood in 18th- and 19th-century history”

New Publication: New Perspectives on European Women’s Legal History

This new addition to the  Routledge Research in Gender and History series will be of interest to many of our readers. Arranged in three parts, focusing on gender and family law, women in the legal professions and transnational and international intersections, it offers broad geographical and thematic coverage for a comparative perspective on women’s legal history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries:

New Perspectives on European Women’s Legal History, (Routledge, 2017)

This book integrates women’s history and legal studies within the broader context of modern European history in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Sixteen contributions from fourteen countries explore the ways in which the law contributes to the social construction of gender. They analyze questions of family law and international law and highlight the politics of gender in the legal professions in a variety of historical, social and national settings, including Eastern, Southern, Western, Northern and Central Europe. Focusing on different legal cultures, they show us the similarities and differences in the ways the law has shaped the contours of women and men’s lives in powerful ways. They also show how women have used legal knowledge to struggle for their equal rights on the national and transnational level. The chapters address the interconnectedness of the history of feminism, legislative reforms, and women’s citizenship, and build a foundation for a comparative vision of women’s legal history in modern Europe.

Call for Papers: ESSHC panel on Formal and Informal Networks of Migrant Women and Men

CFP for a panel at the European Social Science History Conference (ESSHC)

Belfast, 4-7 April 2018   

Formal and informal networks of migrant women and men in settlement process

(14th-19th centuries)

Organiser: Beatrice Zucca Micheletto, GRHIS – University of Rouen (France)

This panel aims to study settlement patterns of migrants, according to a gendered approach. Since the pioneering work by Morokvasic (1984) research has shown that women participated in migrations not only as followers of their husbands, fathers or brothers but also as independent actors. At the same time, a new challenge came from the recent Italian historiography: according to some scholars (Quaderni Storici 2001; Arru, Ramella 2003; Arru, Caglioti, Ramella 2008) most of the works on the topic, influenced by the notion of “migratory chain”, took into account exclusively migrants who, since they arrival, were inserted in national or regional networks, with the consequence that their alleged “new” social network was composed almost exclusively by compatriots. On the contrary, these Italian scholars pointed out the importance of individual migration paths, and studied primarily the social relationships that people were able to build up in the new context, rather than emphasise the pre-existent national or regional ties.  Continue reading “Call for Papers: ESSHC panel on Formal and Informal Networks of Migrant Women and Men”